Virtual reality is the golden child of the tech industry. From Oculus to Magic Leap, venture capitalists and large tech companies have invested in a future where virtual reality may become a large part of our day-to-day life. But what will happen when VR becomes well-adopted? We’ve seen terribly-designed websites—what dubious design decisions will evolve from VR as a medium?

In the field of UX, there has been a trend of tracking eye movements—they tell you when a person is paying attention to a certain part of the design, often signaling your user’s intent and concentration. It is also an intuitive movement—users will often keep their gaze at the piece of the interface that they want to interact with, sometimes without even knowing what they’re looking for—which makes it an easier action to adopt. We have tried to take advantage of this natural and easy-to-adopt movement by creating an object that requires you to physically look at the interactive aspect in order to manipulate it.

We also looked at common body language. Something that we learn from a very young age is that nodding your head means ‘yes’, while shaking your head from side to side means ‘no’. Why can’t we take advantage of this common movement and make it an intuitive command for virtual reality? We have created a sensor that is specifically designed to watch out for these commands in order to proceed in the work flow. It will result in people not having to learn any new movement if they wanted to intuitively use our interface—everything that comes naturally to them will simply give your virtual reality device enough power.

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However, these are very practical functions—technology is often marked by the impractical and the humor-inducing interactions. The prevalence of companies like giphy serving to advance the lexicon of the internet by making gifs easier to search lead us to question the role of virtual reality in the creation of a new kind online culture. How could this physically surround the user?

Future Features:

One thing that forced people to relearn their learned movements was when Apple changed the direction of their scrolling on the Mac. This understandably annoyed a lot of people—it forced them into doing the opposite of their expected actions—but with the prevalence of touch screens in our everyday devices, it made sense to reorient people’s expectations to. Now, people use the Mac’s ‘natural scroll’ feature without hesitation or confusion. Thinking about this change led us to thinking about what kind of movements might be reversed to be opposite to our expectations.